Hypnotherapy & Mindfulness & Counselling In Ashford Nr Heathrow Surrey

Call us: 01784 392 449
13 Clarendon Road, Ashford, Surrey, TW15 2QJ.

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Anger and rage management

  • by Alan Piper
  • 28 Dec, 2016

Anger and rage management

angry man sitting

Anger is a natural, though sometimes unwanted or irrational, emotion that everybody experiences from time to time.  

Anger experts describe the emotion as a primary, natural emotion which has evolved as a way of surviving and protecting yourself from what is considered a wrong-doing.

Mild anger may be brought on by feeling tired, stressed or irritated, in fact we are more likely to feel irritated if our basic human needs (food, shelter, sex, sleep, etc.) are not met or are jeopardised in some way.

We may become angry when reacting to frustration, criticism or a threat and this is not necessarily a bad or inappropriate reaction.

We can also feel irritated by other people’s beliefs, opinions and actions and hence anger can affect our ability to communicate effectively - making us more likely to say or do unreasonable or irrational things.

Being unreasonable or irrational can lead others around us to feel threatened, resentful or angry themselves and, again, these can all be barriers to effective communication.

Anger can also be a ‘secondary emotion’ to feeling sad, frightened, threatened or lonely.

It is useful to try to understand why you (or somebody else) is feeling angry at any given time so that the root causes can be addressed and problems solved.

Anger can be expressed in many ways; different types of anger affect people differently and can manifest to produce different actions and signs of anger. The most common signs of anger are both verbal and non-verbal.

It can be clear that somebody is angry from what they say or how they say it, or from their tone of voice. Anger can also be expressed through body language and other non-verbal cues: trying to look physically bigger (and therefore more intimidating), staring, frowning and clenching of fists.  Some people are very good at internalising their anger and it may be difficult to notice any physical signs. It is, however, unusual for an actual physical attack to transpire without ‘warning’ signs appearing first.

At a basic instinctual level anger may be used as a way to help protect territory or family members, secure or protect mating privileges, protect against loss of food or other possessions, or as a response to other perceived threats.

Some common triggers to anger include:

  • Grief and/or sadness, loss of a family member, friend or other loved one.
  • Rudeness, poor interpersonal skills and/or poor service.
  • Tiredness, since people may have shorter tempers and be more irritable when tired.
  • Hunger.
  • Injustice: for example infidelity, being bullied, humiliated or embarrassed, or being told that you, or a loved one, has a serious illness.
  • Sexual frustration.
  • Money problems and the stress associated with debt.
  • Some forms of stress, unrealistic deadlines and things beyond our immediate control such as being stuck in traffic.
  • A feeling of failure or disappointment.
  • Becoming angry as a result of taking drugs or alcohol, or when withdrawing from such substances.
  • Having a crime committed against you or a loved one: theft, violence, sexual offences but also more minor things such as a feeling of being treated inappropriately.
  • Being either physical or mentally unwell, being in pain or living with a serious illness can lead to feeling angry.
  • When we are angry, our bodies release the hormones adrenaline and cortisol, the same hormones released when we encounter stress.

    As a result of these releases in hormones our blood pressure, pulse, body temperature and breathing rate may increase, sometimes to potentially dangerous levels. This natural chemical reaction is designed to give us an instant boost of energy and power and is often referred to as the 'fight or flight' reaction. This means that the body and mind prepare for a fight or for running away from danger.

    However, people who get angry often cannot manage their anger effectively and can become ill, just as stress that is left unresolved may make you ill. Our bodies are not designed to withstand high levels of adrenaline and cortisol over long periods or on a very regular basis.

    Some of the health problems that may occur as a result of being angry regularly or for long periods of time can include:

    • Aches and pains, usually in the back and head.
    • High blood pressure, which can, in severe cases, lead to serious complaints such as stroke or cardiac arrest.
    • Sleep problems.
    • Problems with digestion.
    • Skin disorders.
    • Reduced threshold for pain.
    • Impaired immune system.

    Anger can also lead to psychological problems such as:

    • Depression.
    • Reduced self confidence.
    • Eating disorders.
    • Alcoholism.
    • Substance abuse.
    • Self-injury.

    It should be clear, therefore, that, anger can be detrimental to health. If anger is (or becomes) a problem should be managed.


Hypnotherapy for anger:

Hypnotherapy can help those with anger management problems in several ways. The initial aim of the hypnotherapist will be to understand the root cause of your anger.

As previously mentioned, anger management problems often stem from past experiences. These experiences can shape your behaviour and belief system. So while you may think another person or situation is causing your anger, it may well come from yourself. Once this is understood, your hypnotherapist can begin work changing this.

To do so, your hypnotherapist will work on a conscious and unconscious level to help change your negative thought processes. Doing this may involve relaxation techniques and suggestions from your hypnotherapist to help control your anger.

The hope is that this will change your reaction to anger triggers. Instead of feeling overwhelmed and angry, you should feel calmer and more relaxed. Feeling calmer in stressful situations helps you to think more clearly so you can react in a more appropriate way.

Anger management hypnotherapy can also help with some of the symptoms of anger. For example, if you are suffering from anxiety, stress or depression hypnotherapy can be helpful.

The number of anger management hypnotherapy sessions you'll need will depend on your individual circumstances. It is likely that your hypnotherapist will teach you some self-hypnosis techniques and relaxation tips. You can use these at home when you feel angry or stressed to help you control your anger in the long-term.

For more information or to book an appointment for anger management call us on 01784 392449.



Hypnotherapy in Ashford,Staines,Sunbury,Chiswick

by Alan Piper 21 May, 2017
We are based in Ashford Surrey, Just 8 Mins from Heathrow Airport. For all your corporate and conference needs, call us on 01784392449
by Alan Piper 18 May, 2017

Alan Piper - HPA, DipNLP, MUFH, GHSC/GHR, DipCMT

I am Alan R Piper, a member of the General Hypnotherapy Standards Council and General Hypnotherapy Register. I also hold a diploma in neuro-linguistic programming and complete mind therapy.

I trained exclusively on a one-to-one basis with the late and most respected of clinical hypnotherapists Bob Neill. (Bob Neill was one of the forefathers of hypnotherapy and had studied, developed and practiced hypnotherapy since the 1950s up until his death in 2006).

Some of my qualifications and certifications include:
  • Diploma in Complete Mind Therapy - (CMT) Dip.C.M.T
  • Diploma in Neuro-linguistic programming - (NLP) Dip.N.L.P.
  • Diploma in Clinical Hypnotherapy - HPA (Hypnotherapy Practitioners Association)
  • Philosophical Counselling Practitioner in Hypnotherapy Practitioners Association
  • Member of General Hypnotherapy Standards Council (GHSC)
  • Member of General Hypnotherapy Register (GHR)

I am also a  Reiki  and Shamanic master specialising in panic disorders, stress, and anxiety. I am GHR and GHSC registered, following a strict code of ethics and practice (as part of membership conditions). I am fully insured with Public Liability and Professional Indemnity Insurance.

If you are looking for a professional  hypnotherapist  or psychotherapist, simply get in touch with me. Based in Ashford, my services are easily available to those across the London and Surrey regions.

by Alan Piper 16 May, 2017

BODY SCAN

Begin by feeling into your body lying here.

Feeling the areas of contact at this moment.  Where your feet are touching the ground.  The legs, your back, the arms, the head.

Noticing your breath, entering and leaving your body.

The intention of the this is to be present with our body without wanting anything at all. Not even relaxation. Of course, it’s nice to relax and its great if it happens, but that is not the goal of the body scan. The goal is to be checking in with each area of the body in a non-judgmental way. We simply feel what is there to feel. No need to stir up sensations by moving the body.

You will notice that there are a number of areas in the body that you might not be able to feel at all. And that is normal and ok. Just check into those areas as if you could feel something.

Starting with the feet, feeling into both feet right now.

Feeling into the areas where your feet are touching the ground or chair.

Maybe feeling your toes – or not. Maybe feeling tingling or temperature.

Now moving the attention to your ankles and lower legs. What is here to feel – if anything at all? Pressure of your calves against the mat? Perhaps the fabric against the skin?

And if you notice that your attention is suddenly somewhere else, just gently returning it to your legs. It’s not a problem at all, the mind likes to wander.

If you find it helpful you can imagine that you are breathing into your lower legs. As if your attention could ride on the breath. Or as if your attention would light up the area like it was a flash light.

Now letting go of the lower legs and moving the attention to your knees and thighs, what do you feel, again maybe pressure, temperature, the position of your legs, or nothing at all, numbness counts as a sensation in this practice.

Noticing that thinking about an area or picturing it in your mind’s eye is different from actually feeling it.

Now letting go of the thighs and moving the attention to the lower trunk. The pelvis and the tummy up to the tummy button. Noticing any sensations in this area. Maybe feeling the breath in the tummy or maybe not.

Then letting go and now feeling into the upper trunk … the stomach area… the chest, feeling the sensations of the breath here… with each inhalation and exhalation.

Feeling the spine against the floor, noticing any sensations that are here or the absence of sensations.

From here now moving the attention into your hands. Feeling your hands, you might notice how well you can feel your hands without having to see the, feeling individual fingers/position of hands.

When you are ready, moving the attention to the wrists/forearms. What is here to feel? Touch/ Pressure: Warmth?

Moving attention to your elbows and upper arms. Noticing any sensations here. And if your mind wanders off, just bringing It back to wherever we are. Just starting again.

From here, moving the attention to your shoulders, back of your neck and then your head. Feeling into your jaw, face, mouth nose, cheeks, eyes, forehead, your entire face.

Now opening the awareness to include the entire body again, being alive, breathing.

If you like, imagining to be breathing from the crown of your head all the way down into your toes and up and out again.

Noticing all the sensations of the body and allowing them to be just as they are in this moment.

Allowing some movement back into the body, like wiggling your fingers and toes. Stretching the body. Coming all the way back into the room.

Just take a few moments to notice what sensations are present in your body right now observe the thoughts going through your mind and check in with the emotions of this moment.
by Alan Piper 16 May, 2017

Starting the Day

Starting your mindfulness right when you wake up requires taking stock of yourself. Hear the sounds outside, notice your breath, look around the room.

Dial your senses into the sensations you encounter as you shower, get dressed, and eat breakfast; all of the things that we do in the morning. Mindfulness incorporates a keen attention to the little details. Make your morning count, be present in it. Don’t think about that meeting at 11 or the presentation this afternoon. Taste the eggs and toast on your plate in front of you at this very moment. You are laying the groundwork for the rest of your day.



Arriving at Work

When you get to the office, don’t get distracted by the inevitable bombardment of information and distractions that are inherent in a workplace environment. Emails, files, voicemails, phone calls, your boss and co-workers, all of them provide continuous, multi-layered stimuli that can affect your mood from one minute to the next. Even the nature of the work that you’re tasked with completing can bring on large amounts of stress quickly.

But try not to get caught up in all of it. Stop periodically. Take a deep breath. Check in with all of your senses. Do some quiet meditations from time to time, it can take the form of a short walk to the break room, sitting upright quietly at your desk for a brief minute, or listening to a calming piece of music in a pair of earphones.                

Remaining centered throughout the day will go a long way towards improving your mood and productivity.



Stop and Think First

The fast-paced nature of a successful workplace can threaten to overwhelm anyone into a stressed rhythm. This may cause undue amounts of pressure and force us to react hastily. How you respond to things is a large part of practicing mindfulness in your daily life.      Being more conscious of your practice at work will probably take a greater commitment at first, but the more you remain aware of yourself and your surroundings the easier it will come.

Many of us tend to react quickly to stimuli, because we automatically feel that is the required action in certain situations. Instead, take pause and deal with the stimuli around you in measured answers. The same goes for solving difficult challenges and problems that might occur during the day. A crisis is not an excuse for you to stop being mindful, in fact it’s a call for you to focus on your training even harder.


The Little Things

Mindfulness comes at all times and in all things. It’s not only about staying in the present and focusing on your behavior when people or situations become intense, it’s also about noticing the minute details and remaining present in them constantly. The way you respond to stress starts in how you react to the little things.

Take pause and just notice the hum of the computer, the way the coffee tastes as you sip, re-read that email because you may have missed something the first time. Remain attentive in everything that you do. It will make the difference between having a good day at the office and one you’ll want to forget. Try it right now as you’re reading this article. Look around you. What do you see, hear, and feel?      

  These are the building blocks to becoming more mindful.


Research studies have found that people who practice mindfulness irrespective of whether they had practised meditation before or not reports:

Feeling less stressed, anxious and depressed, happier, inspired, satisfied with life.
by Alan Piper 09 May, 2017

Mindfulness coach near Heathrow Airport : 01784 392449

by Alan Piper 09 May, 2017

Mindfulness practitioners near Heathrow Airport:  01784 392449

by Alan Piper 07 May, 2017
For stop smoking hypnotherapy in Surrey call us at Wise Blue Owl Therapy Centre: 01784 392449
by Alan Piper 07 May, 2017
by Alan Piper 06 May, 2017

As a professional footballer, if he is fortunate, begins his career as a child and ends it as an adult having known nothing but the same well-organised, rigorous daily schedule. There are even some of us who spend all those best physical years of our youth and adulthood at the same club.

Institutionalised is a description I would apply to my life as a footballer at Manchester United.

I had been there from the age of 14 to 42, and my life had been so distinctively shaped by the rhythm of life at Old Trafford that I realised, when it was coming to the end last year, I had to make some preparations for the change.

Aaron Lennon’s story has made mental health of footballers an issue again and I think that for his sake and everyone else in the game it is important to be open about how we feel as professionals, and how we cope with stress.

I know that those outside of the game will point to our wages and the kind of lives we live and to an extent that does cushion us from the challenges that many face, but it does not make us immune.

by Alan Piper 03 May, 2017
Looking for a motivational coach or speaker for your business. Call us on 01784 392449
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