Hypnotherapy & Mindfulness & Counselling In Ashford Nr Heathrow Surrey

Call us: 01784 392 449
13 Clarendon Road, Ashford, Surrey, TW15 2QJ.

 Therapy for Anxiety,Fear,Phobia,Addiction,Depression,Panic Disorders,Stress,Mental & Emotional Health Disorders,Birthing, Weight loss and more.




Self harming

  • by Alan Piper
  • 04 Dec, 2016

Therapy for self harming Ashford,Staines,Sunbury 

sad   smilie face
The difference between suicide and deliberate self-harm is not as clear as we would like it. Deliberate self-harm can be common pre-cursor to suicide and children and young people who deliberately self-harm may kill themselves by accident. Although completed suicide is a rare occurrence, episodes of self-harm and suicidal behaviour are not.  Early intervention can help to address underlying problems that can lead to such behaviour. Many people who self-harm do not come to the attention of health services and when they do, many do not return or cannot be followed up. Those who do receive services often describe contact as being characterised by ignorance, negative attitudes and sometimes punitive behaviour by professionals towards people who self-harm. As the risk of suicide is considerably higher among people who have self-harmed it is crucial that practitioners are best equipped to give the most helpful initial response in such circumstances.

Self-harm is always a sign of emotional distress and poorly developed coping skills. Whilst it is ultimately damaging and may be dangerous, for many people it provides a method for coping with life. Taking away a person’s means of self-harm can increase the emotional distress and make the situation worse. 


Definitions of Self-Harm and Suicide
• Self-harm is self –harm without suicidal intent, resulting in non-fatal injury
• Attempted suicide is self-harm with intent to take like, resulting in non-fatal injury
• Suicide is self-harm resulting in death Mental Health Foundation 2003


Self-Harm
Research indicates that 1 in 15 young people in Britain have harmed themselves. This probably means that there are probably two people in every secondary school classroom who have done it at some time. Most young people who harm themselves are between 11 and 25 years. Most people start at around 12 years of age but some children as young as 7 have been known to do it. Although there are no typical groups of people who self-harm, about four times as many girls as boys do it. When boys do self harm they may hit themselves or break their own bones to make it look as if they have been involved in a fight or been attacked.

The groups of children and young people who may be more vulnerable to self- harm can include:
• Young people in residential settings such as the armed services,prison, sheltered housing, hostels and boarding schools
• Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender young people
• Young Asian women (one study found that the suicide rate in women aged 16–24 years was three times higher in women of Asian origin than in white British women)
• Young people with learning disabilities
• Young people with existing mental health problems
• Young people with substance misuse problems
• Vulnerable young people who miss appointments and go off the radar.

There are many types of self-harm but these can include:
• Cutting
• Burning
• Scalding
• Banging head and other body parts against walls
• Hair-pulling
• Biting
• Swallowing things that are not edible
• Inserting objects into the body
• Self-poisoning
• Scratching, picking or tearing at skin causing sores and scarring
For more information on how we can help you resolve self harming emotional issues call us at
Wise Blue Owl Thearpy Centre
01784 392449

Hypnotherapy in Ashford,Staines,Sunbury,Chiswick

by Alan Piper 28 May, 2017
To find our more about Shamanic healing and how it may help you call us on 01784 392449
by Alan Piper 28 May, 2017
Free 20 min Anti Anxiety Appointment with Wise Blue Owl 
We can get rid of your anxiety for you.
You are one message or phone call away from your future happiness
01784 392449

by Alan Piper 27 May, 2017
by Alan Piper 26 May, 2017

Following on from just completing a very successful four-day corporate mindfulness event for a major branded corporation's, global leadership conference held near Heathrow, providing mindfulness sessions, from global CEO’s and vice presidents, to global managers, group and department managers, we would like to offer your company the same services.

We are a local small but effective therapy centre, with a wide range of experience and qualifications on mental and emotional health.

What we can offer:

Providing customised group mindfulness sessions for you and your employees, we can tailor make packages for? (the packages we offer):

·        CEO and senior executives.

·        Managers.

·        Employees.

Our single session courses include:

·        Advising your employees on stress and anxiety in the workplace.

·        Teaching your employees how to reduce stress and anxiety in the workplace.

·        Showing your employees some techniques that can reduce anxiety and stress in the workplace when it appears.

 

 

Benefits and outcomes of our courses:

·        Ensures that employees have an understanding of what triggers anxiety and stress.

·        Teaches employees how to deal with stress and anxiety in the workplace therefore increases the ability to deal with stress.

·        Teaches employees the triggers that generate anxiety and stress in the workplace.

·        Improves employees mental and emotional welfare.

·        Improves employee morale and therefore productivity.

·        Reduces employee absenteeism due to stress and anxiety related illnesses.

 

Our courses start from £100 per one hour session per group of employees.

 

·        We can tailor make them for small groups of 10 – 20 employees.

·        We can tailor make for larger groups of employees.

·        We (offer) can arrange them for the early morning, lunchtime or early evening sessions.

·        We can arrange them at your premises.

·        We can assist or arrange them off site.

 

For more information on how we may be able to help you. Please call Allan or Kate on  01784 392449  and we would be happy to discuss these sessions or other arrangements you may have of your own.


by Alan Piper 21 May, 2017
We are based in Ashford Surrey, Just 8 Mins from Heathrow Airport. For all your corporate and conference needs, call us on 01784392449
by Alan Piper 18 May, 2017

Alan Piper - HPA, DipNLP, MUFH, GHSC/GHR, DipCMT

I am Alan R Piper, a member of the General Hypnotherapy Standards Council and General Hypnotherapy Register. I also hold a diploma in neuro-linguistic programming and complete mind therapy.

I trained exclusively on a one-to-one basis with the late and most respected of clinical hypnotherapists Bob Neill. (Bob Neill was one of the forefathers of hypnotherapy and had studied, developed and practiced hypnotherapy since the 1950s up until his death in 2006).

Some of my qualifications and certifications include:
  • Diploma in Complete Mind Therapy - (CMT) Dip.C.M.T
  • Diploma in Neuro-linguistic programming - (NLP) Dip.N.L.P.
  • Diploma in Clinical Hypnotherapy - HPA (Hypnotherapy Practitioners Association)
  • Philosophical Counselling Practitioner in Hypnotherapy Practitioners Association
  • Member of General Hypnotherapy Standards Council (GHSC)
  • Member of General Hypnotherapy Register (GHR)

I am also a  Reiki  and Shamanic master specialising in panic disorders, stress, and anxiety. I am GHR and GHSC registered, following a strict code of ethics and practice (as part of membership conditions). I am fully insured with Public Liability and Professional Indemnity Insurance.

If you are looking for a professional  hypnotherapist  or psychotherapist, simply get in touch with me. Based in Ashford, my services are easily available to those across the London and Surrey regions.

by Alan Piper 16 May, 2017

BODY SCAN

Begin by feeling into your body lying here.

Feeling the areas of contact at this moment.  Where your feet are touching the ground.  The legs, your back, the arms, the head.

Noticing your breath, entering and leaving your body.

The intention of the this is to be present with our body without wanting anything at all. Not even relaxation. Of course, it’s nice to relax and its great if it happens, but that is not the goal of the body scan. The goal is to be checking in with each area of the body in a non-judgmental way. We simply feel what is there to feel. No need to stir up sensations by moving the body.

You will notice that there are a number of areas in the body that you might not be able to feel at all. And that is normal and ok. Just check into those areas as if you could feel something.

Starting with the feet, feeling into both feet right now.

Feeling into the areas where your feet are touching the ground or chair.

Maybe feeling your toes – or not. Maybe feeling tingling or temperature.

Now moving the attention to your ankles and lower legs. What is here to feel – if anything at all? Pressure of your calves against the mat? Perhaps the fabric against the skin?

And if you notice that your attention is suddenly somewhere else, just gently returning it to your legs. It’s not a problem at all, the mind likes to wander.

If you find it helpful you can imagine that you are breathing into your lower legs. As if your attention could ride on the breath. Or as if your attention would light up the area like it was a flash light.

Now letting go of the lower legs and moving the attention to your knees and thighs, what do you feel, again maybe pressure, temperature, the position of your legs, or nothing at all, numbness counts as a sensation in this practice.

Noticing that thinking about an area or picturing it in your mind’s eye is different from actually feeling it.

Now letting go of the thighs and moving the attention to the lower trunk. The pelvis and the tummy up to the tummy button. Noticing any sensations in this area. Maybe feeling the breath in the tummy or maybe not.

Then letting go and now feeling into the upper trunk … the stomach area… the chest, feeling the sensations of the breath here… with each inhalation and exhalation.

Feeling the spine against the floor, noticing any sensations that are here or the absence of sensations.

From here now moving the attention into your hands. Feeling your hands, you might notice how well you can feel your hands without having to see the, feeling individual fingers/position of hands.

When you are ready, moving the attention to the wrists/forearms. What is here to feel? Touch/ Pressure: Warmth?

Moving attention to your elbows and upper arms. Noticing any sensations here. And if your mind wanders off, just bringing It back to wherever we are. Just starting again.

From here, moving the attention to your shoulders, back of your neck and then your head. Feeling into your jaw, face, mouth nose, cheeks, eyes, forehead, your entire face.

Now opening the awareness to include the entire body again, being alive, breathing.

If you like, imagining to be breathing from the crown of your head all the way down into your toes and up and out again.

Noticing all the sensations of the body and allowing them to be just as they are in this moment.

Allowing some movement back into the body, like wiggling your fingers and toes. Stretching the body. Coming all the way back into the room.

Just take a few moments to notice what sensations are present in your body right now observe the thoughts going through your mind and check in with the emotions of this moment.
by Alan Piper 16 May, 2017

Starting the Day

Starting your mindfulness right when you wake up requires taking stock of yourself. Hear the sounds outside, notice your breath, look around the room.

Dial your senses into the sensations you encounter as you shower, get dressed, and eat breakfast; all of the things that we do in the morning. Mindfulness incorporates a keen attention to the little details. Make your morning count, be present in it. Don’t think about that meeting at 11 or the presentation this afternoon. Taste the eggs and toast on your plate in front of you at this very moment. You are laying the groundwork for the rest of your day.



Arriving at Work

When you get to the office, don’t get distracted by the inevitable bombardment of information and distractions that are inherent in a workplace environment. Emails, files, voicemails, phone calls, your boss and co-workers, all of them provide continuous, multi-layered stimuli that can affect your mood from one minute to the next. Even the nature of the work that you’re tasked with completing can bring on large amounts of stress quickly.

But try not to get caught up in all of it. Stop periodically. Take a deep breath. Check in with all of your senses. Do some quiet meditations from time to time, it can take the form of a short walk to the break room, sitting upright quietly at your desk for a brief minute, or listening to a calming piece of music in a pair of earphones.                

Remaining centered throughout the day will go a long way towards improving your mood and productivity.



Stop and Think First

The fast-paced nature of a successful workplace can threaten to overwhelm anyone into a stressed rhythm. This may cause undue amounts of pressure and force us to react hastily. How you respond to things is a large part of practicing mindfulness in your daily life.      Being more conscious of your practice at work will probably take a greater commitment at first, but the more you remain aware of yourself and your surroundings the easier it will come.

Many of us tend to react quickly to stimuli, because we automatically feel that is the required action in certain situations. Instead, take pause and deal with the stimuli around you in measured answers. The same goes for solving difficult challenges and problems that might occur during the day. A crisis is not an excuse for you to stop being mindful, in fact it’s a call for you to focus on your training even harder.


The Little Things

Mindfulness comes at all times and in all things. It’s not only about staying in the present and focusing on your behavior when people or situations become intense, it’s also about noticing the minute details and remaining present in them constantly. The way you respond to stress starts in how you react to the little things.

Take pause and just notice the hum of the computer, the way the coffee tastes as you sip, re-read that email because you may have missed something the first time. Remain attentive in everything that you do. It will make the difference between having a good day at the office and one you’ll want to forget. Try it right now as you’re reading this article. Look around you. What do you see, hear, and feel?      

  These are the building blocks to becoming more mindful.


Research studies have found that people who practice mindfulness irrespective of whether they had practised meditation before or not reports:

Feeling less stressed, anxious and depressed, happier, inspired, satisfied with life.
by Alan Piper 09 May, 2017

Mindfulness coach near Heathrow Airport : 01784 392449

by Alan Piper 09 May, 2017

Mindfulness practitioners near Heathrow Airport:  01784 392449

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